Economics


Contaminated brownfields: how did it come to this in America?

Photograph of brown field with run down brown building
The business is long gone, the buildings removed but the aftermath is not.  Left behind is a “brownfield,” a nice word for a site contaminated with deadly poisons, and no one left to pay for clean-up if that’s even possible. And what to do with it once it is cleaned up? Another industrial site, another fence line community in the poorer part of town where the people of color live. There are thousands of brownfields all over America. How did it come to this? No one intended to damage the Earth and make humans sick. We blundered into it.

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Proven “pot-ential” for rural communities

Photograph of a cannabis leave with more plants in the background.
Governor Evers’ 2021-23 budget will enable Wisconsinites to bounce back from the pandemic stronger than ever. His budget includes initiatives, like marijuana legalization, that will get our economy back on track and create new opportunities for our rural communities.

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Wisconsin Senate Bills beg the question: What’s in a name?

Some meat on barbecue or grilling tools like they were plants.
On February 5th, three bills were read into the record for the first time this year. These three bills are all related to food labeling. While this is a topic which may not gain as much press as many other subjects, it is a topic which we should keep a very close watch on.

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Wisconsin Legislature strikes mask order; Governor reinstates four hours later

Talk to your friends and neighbors; this is not a partisan political issue. It's an issue of what is right vs. what is wrong, and what is good vs. what is bad for the people in our communities and state.

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Retiring the Corporate America flag

Throughout the past few years, so much of what I believed has been turned onto its head. Most notably, my view that corporate influence on government is the greatest threat to democracy.

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America the Beautiful

The same short-sighted, profit-centered thinking that opposed creating the National Parks hinders creating the “good change” we need today.

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Still fighting for $15 minimum wage

Wisconsin has been at $7.25 an hour since 2010 when the state made the increase to keep up with federal minimum wage.

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Defending America from the U.S. Department of Defense

Photo source: National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. WarneckeIn his final year in office, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had also been the 5-star general who led the allied forces against Nazi Germany in World War II, warned Americans against the dangers of maintaining an oversized military and the military-industrial complex itself. He knew this joining of industry and the military could easily grow out of control, could easily drain rather than protect the nation, could easily become a threat to the future of democracy.Here is a ...

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PUBLIC BANKING UNIT V: THE BANK OF NORTH DAKOTA PRESENT

In 2009, in the midst of the greatest economic recession since the Great Depression of the 1930’s, only one state ran a large budget surplus, cut personal and business taxes, and had the lowest unemployment and foreclosure rates in the nation. North Dakota.Quoting from the “Public Banking Legislative Guide” by the Public Banking Institute in 2011, during some of the worst times of the Great Recession:“While lawmakers across the country struggle with difficult, even heart-breaking budget dilemmas, the North Dakota legislature debates whether to cut taxes or ...

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PUBLIC BANKING – UNIT II: THE COST OF “INTEREST”

Let us assume a state needs to replace an aging bridge on one of its state highways. If the contractor’s bid for supplying the materials and completing the construction is two million dollars, the tax payers of that state will eventually pay close to four million dollars for the bridge. How can this possibly be? The answer in a word is - - “interest.”The near doubling of the cost of most public projects, from bridges, to schools, to water and sewage systems, is the result of the legal process of fractional reserve banking through which the quasi-public US Federal ...

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